CAROLYN'S COMPOSITIONS

March 18, 2011

Navy Yard Broadcast from Pearl Harbor: Part 4

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

NAVY YARD BROADCAST FROM PEARL HARBOR: Part 4

This is the final of four parts of a radio broadcast aired from Pearl Harbor, March 18, 1942. The first part, an interview with Albert Briskay, a civilian worker dealing with submarine repair, was posted on December 7, 2009. The final part will be posted March 18, 2011. Links to previous posts are listed at the end of this post.

To view photo illustration,click on: http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolyncholland/3899210556/in/photostream/

 WAHL: Got a little Irish blood in me, myself. Happy to meet you, Mr. Milsop. When did you come over to this country?

MILSOP: You mean to Hawaii?

WAHL: Well, yes….but I meant the United States mainland.

MILSOP: I settled in Patterson, New Jersey, in 1897 and came to Hawaii last month. Was transferred here from the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn.  My family, my wife and three children, are still in Patterson.

WAHL: You have three children, eh?

MILSOP: Yes, two boys—one 35, practicing law, and another 28, who’s a commercial artist. My only daughter is a secretary in the Wright Aeronautical Plant. She’s 24.

WAHL: Mr. Milsop, one of the stock questions in these parts is “What was your first impression of the Islands?”

MILSOP: Are you asking me?

WAHL: Sure, would you care to tell us. You give us the truth, and we’ll take the consequences.

MILSOP: Well, now, I marveled most at the even climate. I like this balmy weather. And everything seems to be so colorful here. When I left New York, it was plenty cold. Freezing, in fact.

WAHL: Mr. Milsop, right here I’d like to ask you just what your reaction has been to our nightly blackouts and gasoline rationing?

MILSOP: Well, I guess it would spoil Hawaii for (more…)

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December 6, 2010

Navy Yard Broadcast from Pearl Harbor: Part 3

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

NAVY YARD BROADCAST FROM PEARL HARBOR: Part 3

This is the third of four parts of a radio broadcast aired from Pearl Harbor, March 18, 1942. The first part, an interview with Albert Briskay, a civilian worker dealing with submarine repair, was posted on December 7, 2009. The final part will be posted March 18, 2011. Links to previous and following posts are listed at the end of this post.

To view photo illustration,click on: http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolyncholland/3899210556/in/photostream/

WAHL: You know, Captain Swain, I was just thinking, in the days of King Kamehameha, the harbor here must have been surrounded by tropical jungle and rolling fields of sugar cane. This world-famous drydock, for instance, the site of our broadcast, is a far cry from Hawaii of half a century ago!

SWAIN: As a matter of fact, Jim, this isn’t the original drydock. The first one started in 1909. The floor under the graving dock was of volcanic rock and coral, and after four years of hard work and plenty of sweat in building it, it collapsed before it was used. That was really the first Pearl Harbor tragedy. Francis Smith—“Drydock” Smith they called him—was the engineer in charge…one of the best in the country. The dock and cofferdam were built, the water pumped out, and the bottom deepened. But, the bottom wasn’t stapled (illegible word) (crossed off: would rise or fall, depending on how much water was pumped). So, they drove concrete piling into the bottom of the harbor. Everything appeared alright, but suddenly one day the crib timbers cracked, the concrete blocks on the bottom were forced up and the cofferdam, built to hold back the sea, collapsed.

WAHL: Yes, and the old Hawaiians said it was all because the (more…)

October 13, 2010

October 13, 2010: The San Jose Mine Rescue

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

OCTOBER 13, 2010: THE SAN JOSE MINE RESCUE

     As I write this post, the following is occurring:

    The 25th miner to be rescued, Renan Avalos, 29, is on his way up. Renan’s younger brother Florencio was the first miner to be brought to the surface just after midnight on Wednesday. He decided to come to work in the San Jose mine four months ago.

     I interrupt my writing to view Renan Avalos’ reunion with his wife. The BBC commentator noted that there is amazing discipline among the press, who are unwilling to invade the privacy of the miner’s reunions, yet who know the whole world is participating in the event unfolding at the San Jose Mine in Chile.

     For me, it’s been a day of distractions characterized by an inability to focus. Partially, it’s that this day follows five hectic days. Two days were absorbed by Fort Ligonier (PA) Days: photographing its ninety–minute parade, manning our Beanery Writers Group table, and enjoying festival concert. On Sunday my husband Monte and I traveled to Harrisburg for a conference on poverty, which ended mid-afternoon on Monday. Leaving the conference, we headed to Minersville, where I finally met two fourth cousins—Bob and Allen Borinsky—who filled me in on some family history. We left Minersville, ate in Pottsville, and found a motel room a little further on. Tuesday morning we took side routes—not the interstate—back to Laurel Mountain Borough, arriving in time to attend Mellow Mike, where I was guided some writers in practice writing about structures.

     It seems coincidental that Lawrence Borinsky, the grandfather of Bob and Allen, died in a mining accident in Minersville. He was 27 years old. He left behind a two year old son, William a.k.a. Vince, the father of the two brothers.

     So perhaps my restlessness is due to tiredness.

    Or perhaps it’s due to the fact that the date is the thirteenth—even though it’s Wednesday, not Friday.

    However, a large part of the distraction is a deep-seated need to participate in a global celebration—good news, for a change—surpassing that which happened at the Quecreek Mines in July, 2002 (QUECREEK MINE DISASTER: A 21st Century Historical Site in Somerset County, PA).  Then, nine miners were rescued—a miracle. Although I lived about twenty miles from the site, I watched in New Jersey, where I was visiting my sister, Kitty.

      Today, thirty-three miners are being rescued. Is one rescue scene more miraculous than the other? Not really…but as the world (more…)

March 25, 2010

Amish Grace, Thomas Cornell, & Intertwined Love: Risks of Writing Historical Fiction

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

AMISH GRACE, INTERTWINED LOVE, & THOMAS CORNELL:

The Risks of Writing Historical Fiction

     “…the most disturbing aspect of the upcoming television move “Amish Grace” is the fictional liberties it takes in depicting the aftermath of the 2006 killings of five Amish girls in a Nickel Mines schoolhouse,” according to Herman Bontrager, an Akron man who acted as a spokesman for the Nickel Mines Amish community after the shootings. “Amish tell the truth and are accustomed to telling the truth. When you take an account like this, and make it appear like it happened, and fictionalize it, that’s troubling.”*

     Authors of the book on which the movie is based, “Amish Grace: How Forgiveness Transcended Tragedy,” agree on this point.**

     Fiction based on an actual historical framework is always up for criticism. It’s an issue I’ve been aware of since I began delving in writing my novel, “Intertwined Love.” The historical framework includes 1790s people, both the well known— Henry Knox, William Duer, William Bingham, Alexander Baring, Thomas Jefferson among them—and the less well known: Franco van Berckle, Madame Rosalie de Leval, Louis des Isles, Mary Googins, and Joseph Swett.

     I encountered the criticism issue in two situations. First, my in-depth research disproved some oral traditions about East Lamoine, Maine. I shared the documentation with a community native. The late Gladys Vigent (a Samuel Des Isles descendent) was (to continue reading this post click on: http://intertwinedlove.wordpress.com/2010/03/25/amish-grace-thomas-cornell-intertwined-love-risks-of-writing-historical-fiction/ )

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ADDITIONAL READING:

KILLED STRANGELY: A NEW ENGLAND MURDER STORY

Two Photographers Named Cornell

POPHAM BEACH, MAINE

CHILDISH CHARACTERISTICS

RAINBOW’S END Part 1

March 18, 2010

Navy Yard Broadcast from Pearl Harbor: Part 2

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

NAVY YARD BROADCAST FROM PEARL HARBOR: Part 2

This is the second of four parts of a radio broadcast aired from Pearl Harbor, aired March 18, 1942. The first part, an interview with Albert Briskay, a civilian worker dealing with submarine repair, was posted on December 7, 2009 (Pearl Harbor: A 1942 Radio Broadcast Script ). The third part will be posted December 7, 2010, and the final part will be posted March 18, 2011.

 To view photo illustration,click on: http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolyncholland/3899210556/in/photostream/

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NAVY YARD BROADCAST

KGU to NBC

1100-1115  –  Wednesday, March 18, 1942

WAHL: Remember Pearl Harbor? This broadcast comes to you from the pulsating heart of that gigantic mid-Pacific naval base, 2200 miles west and south of San Francisco. Until three months ago, Pearl Harbor was just a name! Today it is a legend…..the place where our war began. Here are all the complex activities that comprise a naval base.

And there are men – thousands of them – civilian workers- who ready the ships for new jobs at sea when they come in from scouring the seventy million square miles of this Pacific battle front. For every man at sea there must be many ashore – just as every plane in the air needs ground crews to service it.

Today we are speaking to you from one of Pearl Harbor’s biggest servicing centers – from the edge of one of the great drydocks. Listen a minute to the sound and the fury of Pearl Harbor at work!

SOUND   UP AND HOLD FIVE TO TEN SECONDS

WAHL: This is Jim Wahl, speaking for KGU and the National Broadcasting Company. Today we’re going to try and give you a brief picture of some of the men at Pearl Harbor and of the jobs they do. We’re fortunate in having as our guide Captain Charles D. Swain, production officer of this Navy Yard. Captain, I’m a Grade A landlubber (more…)

June 18, 2009

Health care reform & Silver Sneakers

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

HEALTH CARE REFORM & SILVER SNEAKERS

A month ago I joined the Silver Sneakers program at the Ligonier (PA) YMCA. Since participating, I can feel the positive physical effects. Since national health care discussions place this Medicare Advantage program in jeopardy, Silver Sneakers members were asked to write a letter explaining why this program should not be eliminated to reduce governmental health care costs. Below is my letter. Please write one of your own and send it to your legislators.

A nation, a community, a family, are only as healthy as its people.

Thus, quality health care, including preventive and rehabilitative care, should be a major priority. Yet, escalating health care costs are threatening the health of the American people.

Persons who knowingly promote their ill-health should be required to take responsibility for the consequences. Conversely, persons who take responsibility to maintain/regain/improve their health, thereby decreasing the need for medical care, should not be penalized.

The Medicare Advantage funding of the Silver Sneakers health maintainance/rehabilitative exercise program, geared towards improving/developing the health of America’s senior citizens, is an example of preventative medicine.

Health care reform discussions include the Silver Sneakers program. This issue is likely to be part of the health care reform bill being drafted this summer. And it is likely the discussions and results of the discussions will be (more…)

May 25, 2009

Why women stay in abusive relationships: Is this the right question?

CAROLYN’S COMPOSTITIONS

WHY WOMEN STAY IN ABUSIVE RELATIONSHIPS:

IS THIS THE RIGHT QUESTION?

      Why would a woman who’s been savagely beaten by her boyfriend run right back into his arms?

     That was the question people asked when singer Rihanna, who not only didn’t press charges after her boyfriend (singer Chris Brown) allegedly assaulted her in February, but may have even reconciled with him.

     It’s a question asked repeatedly by persons familiar with any abuse situation where the victim returns to a dangerous situation. And it’s a hard situation for most people to understand.

     Most often, the abused woman’s self-esteem is (more…)

March 24, 2009

Found: Flash Drive. What should I do?

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITONS

FOUND: FLASH DRIVE. WHAT SHOULD I DO?

     As my college friend Michael stood in my living room, preparing to leave following his first visit to my home after fifteen years, he pulled a blue flash drive from his pocket.
     “I found it in a parking lot,” he claimed about the electronic gadget that is so small it is easier to lose than to keep. Such a thing can slip out of a brief case, get misplaced in (more…)

March 11, 2009

Kathy Kelly, of Voices of Wilderness: On Peace

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

KATHY KELLY, of VOICES OF WILDERNESS: ON PEACE

     Today’s e-mail brought an announcement that peace activist and educator Kathy Kelly will be the Sister Mary Schmidt Lecture Series speaker on March 24, 2009, at 7:00 p.m. (See end of this post for further information). Kathy helps coordinate the Voices for a Creative Nonviolence, a campaign to end military and economic warfare against Iraq. This three-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee has participated in nonviolent direct action teams in Haiti, Bosnia, and Iraq.
     When my husband Monte and I were traveling New England in the fall of  2003, we found ourselves in Lewisberg, Maine. There, I spotted a meeting announcement on a grocery store bulletin board. The speaker was Kathy Kelly. Below is my journal entry on that evening.

 
     One night I suggested to Monte that we attend a meeting where a woman from Iraq was speaking about her experiences being in that country during the war. Since the meeting was preceded by a pot-luck dinner, we purchased an adorable yellow-iced cake with brown mice on it. After all, we were traveling and our cooking facilities were limited.  (view photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolyncholland/3347179523/in/photostream/ )
     When we arrived, the activity seemed very loosely run, so much so that I felt uncomfortable. No one seemed to know what was (more…)

October 6, 2008

BRAMBLES (Brief RAMBLES) 1-10 September 1, 2008

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

BRAMBLES (Brief RAMBLES) 1-10 September 1, 2008

 

SEVENTH HEAVEN THEME MUSIC

CHEERS THEME MUSIC

CONNECTEDNESS

 

THEME MUSIC FOR THE SIT-COM SEVENTH HEAVEN
     When I hear the theme music to the sit-com Seventh Heaven, it makes me ponder:

There’s no greater feeling than love of a family
Where can you go when the world don’t treat you right
The answer is home
That’s the one place you’ll find, Seventh Heaven

     As I listen, thoughts of the many persons whom I’ve counseled come to mind. Many of them couldn’t go home. Away is where they escaped. Their “love of a family” sometimes—no, often—taught them (more…)

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