CAROLYN'S COMPOSITIONS

October 2, 2014

Remembering Ellsworth & Lamoine, Maine

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

REMEMBERING ELLSWORTH AND LAMOINE, MAINE

I’ve said this in previous writings: the most common question my husband Monte and I are asked about our autumn trips to New England is: Are you going to leaf peep? Certainly New England puts on a great display of brilliant fall leaves, but I can vouch that the hills of Southwestern Pennsylvania matches their splendor. No, we don’t go to leaf peep. We much prefer ocean viewing.

We were completing our 2013 travel to New England as September rolled over into October. On our return home—driving across New England into New York and south to Pennsylvania—some trees gave us a sneak peak of grandiose leaves, but we were traveling before they peaked. Thus, we enjoyed being inadvertent leaf peepers, viewing what many tourists drive to New England to do: enjoy autumn’s march from summer into winter.

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Last year my husband Monte and I were visiting the towns of Ellsworth and Lamoine in Downeast Maine on September 30 and October 1. We stayed several days at SeaCat’s Rest, on the banks of the Jordan River, where our hosts were Bruce Gillett and Kathleen Rybarz and their Maine Coon cat.

131001 IMG_7556EA wall of windows gave us a view of the Jordan River, but wandering to the river’s edge provided great photo opportunities throughout the day and into the evening.

131001 IMG_7519EAs wonderfully calming SeaCat’s Rest was we couldn’t laze around all day.

On Monday, the 30th, we headed to the Ellsworth Public Library, where I had the opportunity to meet with Mark E. Honey. He’s a Maine history buff who has done much writing about Hancock County, which is the setting of my historic romance novel—and some of my ancestors. We’d had occasional contact through the years but had never met. I was amazed at what he had accomplished in spite of the fact that he has a disabling illness chaining him to a wheelchair. We both agreed that Downeast history is fascinating, and that this library has always been helpful and encouraging to those of us interested in researching the area.

Upon our return to SeaCat’s Rest the Jordan River reflected the hues of orange, pink, and gray from a sunset exploding from behind several mountains located on Mt. Desert Island, across the water. Patches of bright blue peeked through the cloud-like sunset. This breathtaking scene is perfect as September rolls into October and my time in Downeast Maine is coming to an end.  130930 IMG_7419 Jordan RiverE

130930 IMG_7422E

On Tuesday we headed to the deeds office at the Hancock County Courthouse. It’s enjoyable to have the freedom to (more…)

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June 14, 2012

United States Flags of a Different Kind

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

NOTE: CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS now located at

Carolyn’s Online Magazine

UNITED STATES FLAGS OF A DIFFERENT KIND

FLAG DAY: JUNE 14, 2012

Four names are painted on top of this silo located along Rt. 81 in New York State:

Sgt. Frasier, LCPL Schwarz, LCPL Echols, ODC Anderson on top of silo.

Who are they?

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     Throughout the years, while traveling close to home and afar from home, Monte and I have seen structures—silos, garage doors, houses—painted with flags.

Garage door in Ligonier Township, Pennsylvania.

     Before I posted the photos I researched the etiquette of doing this. I was unable to locate an answer to that question. I’m still left wondering what the etiquette is about painting a flag on structures or painting a house to represent the flag.

House located on Lamoine Road in Lamoine, Maine. (2003 Photo)

      However, I found a couple of recent posts relating to painting of flags on structures. The first was written about a house painted to look like an American flag, allegedly to protest their homeowners association (rules prohibiting the flying of the flag). One of the arguments that it wasn’t a protest was presented on a blog, Bent Corner, written from Hagerstown, Maryland:

it’s illegal for a homeowners association to bar someone from displaying the American flag. The federal Freedom to Display the American Flag Act of 2005, makes it illegal for a homeowners association to restrict homeowners from displaying the American flag on their property.

It’s literally a federal offense for a homeowners association to restrict flying the American flag.1

While at the Upstate University Hospital in Syracuse, New York, last February I came acrossthe following flag made by a security guard using cardboard rolls from an identification-making machine:

And while traveling in New England in 2003 a lobster shack in New Castle, New Hampshire,  sported the following:

While I am still puzzled over the etiquette of these paintings, I’ve seen them all over the country where I’ve traveled. They are creative and patriotic. Please enjoy this artwork when you discover it.

NOTE: The Freedom to Display the American Flag Act of 2005, signed into law by former President Bush on July 24, 1005, reads:

Sec. 3. Right to Display the Flag of the United States
A condominium association, cooperative association, or residential real estate management association may not adopt or enforce any policy, or enter into any agreement, that would restrict or prevent a member of the association from displaying the flag of the United States on residential property within the association with respect to which such member has a separate ownership interest or a right to exclusive possession or use.
Sec. 4. Limitations.
Nothing in this Act shall be considered to permit any display or use that is inconsistent with –
(1) any provision of chapter 1 of title 4, United States Code, or any rule or custom pertaining to the proper display or use of the flag of the United States (as established pursuant to such chapter or any otherwise applicable provision of law); or
(2) any reasonable restriction pertaining to the time, place, or manner of displaying the flag of the United States necessary to protect a substantial interest of the condominium association, cooperative association, or residential real estate management association.2

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ADDITIONAL READING:

Flag Man (Bob Cornell) Shivers

Swedish National Flag Day: June 6, 2012

Carolyn’s Compositions Top Twelve Posts (April 2012)

SOURCES:

1http://bentcorner.com/someone-supposedly-paints-house-like-an-american-flag-in-protest-of-homeowners-association/

2http://www.insidejustice.com/law/index.php/intl/2008/07/04/us_flag_restrictions_laws

3http://kensingtonbrooklynblog.com/2012/05/vandalizing-of-painted-american-flag.html

July 3, 2010

A Day in My Life: July 2, 2010 Journal

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

A DAY IN MY LIFE: JULY 2, 2010

JOURNAL

       July 2, 2010. Another month slips into my life. Where, oh where, did June go? I didn’t even realize that yesterday was July 1!

     My husband Monte and I are sitting in South Park at South Park, a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  suburb. We arrived at 6:45 for an 8:00 p.m. Pittsburgh Symphony concert.

     I cannot recall the last time that I’ve been in such a huge crowd. Our chairs were in a good spot, what would be the center front section of a concert hall. At 7:15 we were reminded that the concert began at 8:00. At 7:40 I wandered around, surveying the crowd and taking pictures.       

     There is a variety of people here—oldsters, young people, some teenagers, younger children, a few infants—and some dogs, fewer than I would expect in this crowd. People are reading books and newspapers, eating, picnicking, playing board games, juggling. And socializing. Monte suggested that we were sitting in a “reserved” section—most of the people surrounding us seem to know each other.

   It’s a perfect night. I think I saw a sign proclaiming it was 79 degrees. There is a butterfly flicker of a breeze. Trees provide shade for many attendees. However, the outside row of the concert string section is either wearing sunglasses or perhaps squinting in the sun—waiting for it to set so that their eyes won’t be light-blasted.

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     About 9:00 this morning (more…)

August 28, 2008

PENNSYLVANIA WEDDING, (LAMOINE) MAINE ROOTS

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS
PENNSYLVANIA WEDDING, (LAMOINE) MAINE ROOTS

ANNOUNCEMENT
The bride in a Pennsylvania wedding is a descendant of the first settlers in Trenton (which included Lamoine), Massachusetts (now Maine).

WEDDING
Sandra N. Holland and Michael R. Murawsky were married July 12, 2008, at Lebanon United Methodist Church in Ligonier, Pennsylvania. Sandra is the daughter of Monte W. and Carolyn (Cornell) Holland, Laurel Mountain Borough, Pennsylvania. Michael is the son of Ronald and Sheila (Marien) Murawski of Houtzdale, Pennsylvania.

The bride wore (more…)

June 25, 2008

LOGGING IN MAINE AND ON THE PERU-BRAZILIAN BORDER

Through the years, the logging industry has played a major role. Below are four scenerios, from the Peru-Brazilian border; Sullivan, Maine; the Penobscot Million lands in Hancock/Washington counties, Massachusetts (Maine) in the 1790s, and Maine’s unorganized territory in 2008.

SCENERIO 1

The amazing pictures were beamed around the globe: a handful of warriors from an ‘undiscovered tribe’ in the rainforest on the Brazilian-Peruvian border brandishing bows and arrows at the aircraft that photographed them. These photographs were published to make a political point, to perhaps (more…)

April 16, 2008

IN SEARCH OF THE ARABELLA: A Story of Two Boats

CONTEST ANNOUNCEMENT!

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS is awarding a monthly prize to the reader who makes the most comments at www.carolyncholland.wordpress.com. To enter, comment on any post. The more comments you post, the greater chance you have of winning. For further details click on the page MONTHLY PRIZE FOR COMMENTS at the top of the column to the right. 

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

IN SEARCH OF THE ARABELLA: A Story of Two Boats

Between April 8 and June 12, 1630, a fleet of 17 ships carrying over 1000 passengers set sail from Yarmouth, England to Salem, Massachusetts. It was under the command of Massachusetts Governor John Winthrop, who sailed with 400 emigrants aboard the flagship (more…)

February 10, 2008

OH, TO CLIMB SCHOODIC MOUNTAIN (Maine)

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I invite you to visit the new site and encourage you to Follow it.

OH, TO CLIMB SCHOODIC MOUNTAIN

I am writing a historic romance novel in which one scene will be about an independent French land speculator, Madame Rosalie de la Val, seeking to purchase land in Lamoine, Maine. In order to see the land, she climbs Schoodic Mountain. Thus, the last time my husband Monte and I visited Maine, we too climbed Schoodic Mountain. Below is a journal of our trek up the big hill.  —Carolyn C. Holland

On Saturday, October 7, 2006. Monte and I climbed Maine’s coastline Schoodic Mountain with my niece Erin, her husband Greg and their two children, Paige (seven) and Morgan (five), who live in a coastal Maine town. It was my suggestion. I wanted to see and experience what the main character in the first part of my novel, Madame Rosalie de la Val, saw and experienced when she climbed the mountain in 1791 to survey lands she was speculating on.  (to read the rest of this article, click on  
Oh, to Climb Schoodic Mtn.) (more…)

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