CAROLYN'S COMPOSITIONS

March 31, 2009

Madame Rosalie de la Val: A Character Sketch

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

MADAME ROSALIE BACLER de la VAL:

A Character Sketch

Since March is Women’s History Month, and March 8 was International (Working) Women’s Day, I developed a character sketch on Madame Rosalie Bacler, a French émigré who came to the United States during the French Revolution, and who was a “working” woman, a “noble” who planned a French refugee colony in the Massachusetts Territory of Maine. Whenever I “introduce” this historical female to people, they become fascinated. Madame is the main character in the historical romance novel that I am attempting to write.

     Madame Rosalie Bacler de la Val, a French émigré who came to the United States to escape the atrocities of the French revolution, was an independent land speculator/settler in what is known today as Hancock County, Maine. In the 1790s, this region it was the Maine Territory of the State of Massachusetts, part of the Penobscot Land Tract purchased from the State of Massachusetts by land speculators Henry Knox and William Duer.
     Only about ten percent of the post-American Revolution land speculators worked independently, outside a company. None, as far as I have encountered, were women—much less (more…)

Advertisements

February 24, 2009

Compagnie du Scioto Meeting at Cafe le Procope (Novel #3B)

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

COMPAGNIE DU SCIOTO MEETING AT CAFÉ LE PROCOPE: Novel #3B

 

 

To read the first part of this post click on: Compagnie du Scioto Meeting at Café le Procope: Novel #3A

   “This coffee is superb,” Jean-Jacques said, standing up to greet them, and, tilting his head almost inaudibly said, “and this table is in a spot where we can talk with some privacy of the matter before us.”
    As the men as they settled down, making certain the stranger was between them, Jean-Jacques asked   “How was the trip from Alencon?” Then he took his seat, all the while eyeing the stranger before him.
     “This is Richard,” Charles said softly to Jean-Jacques while not quite looking at him. “He heard about the American lands, how they offer the opportunity to have a French settlement in the new land, and is quite interested. I brought him with me so he can hear more about our plans.”
     The man, not quite looking up, shook his head, as a confirmation of Charles’ words. There was something quite appealing in his gesture, something familiar to Jean-Jacques, something he couldn’t quite put his finger on.
     “Are you sure he should be here?” Although Jean-Jacques asked Charles this question with his eyes, Charles understood (more…)

February 22, 2009

Compagnie du Scioto Meeting at Café le Procope: Novel #3A

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

COMPAGNIE DU SCIOTO MEETING AT CAFÉ LE PROCOPE Novel #3A

 

     In 1787 High-level American politicians and military officers succeeded pressing the Scioto Land Grant, a sub-grant of the Northwest Territory Ohio Land Grant, through Congress. In 1788 these men, hoping to reap a fortune from their investment in this land, sent poet/politician Joel Barlow to France to sell a large chunk of it. Joel failed dismally until he met an Englishman, William Playfair, and an aristocrat, a monarchiens, a leader of the National Assembly of France Jean-Jacques d’Epremesmil.
     Hoping to make money in land speculation, William and Jean-Jacques helped Joel craft a land-sale deed that included the formation of a land-sales company, Compagnie du Scioto, on November 3, 1789. Persons joining this company were well-to-do capitalists, military men, noblemen, officials and visionaries. The major participants, many who bought acreage for their own land speculation, became known as The Societe des Vingt-Quatres. Members purchased at least one thousand acres, while Jean-Jacques, realizing the potential for a huge financial gain, purchased 11,000 acres.

January 1790, Paris, France
      Joel Barlow, William Playfair and Jean-Jacques d’Epremesnil occupied a table that offered privacy at the crowded Café le Procope (view photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolyncholland/3298110433/ ) while waiting for Jean Baptiste de la Roche, Louis Des Isles and Charles de Laittre, to join them. The three men waiting, founders of The Societe des Vingt-Quatres, sipped (more…)

August 19, 2008

BRAMBLES (Brief RAMBLES) 1-9 August 15, 2008

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS
BRAMBLES (Brief RAMBLES) 1-9  August 15, 2008

CHILDREN’S SLEAZY BACK TO SCHOOL CLOTHING STYLES
BLAME IT ON FRANCE

CHILDREN’S SLEAZY BACK TO SCHOOL CLOTHING STYLES

It’s back to school for the youth and children in America.

Last year, fashions allowed in the schools were appalling. Young children WERE ALLOWED to (more…)

August 6, 2008

PROCOPE CAFÉ, PARIS Part 2

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS
PROCOPE CAFÉ, PARIS Part 2

To read Procope Café Part 1 click on: PROCOPE CAFÉ, PARIS: Part 1—Finding photographs: An International Adventure

The Procope’s history is closely linked with eighteenth century revolutionary ideas.
 
Sicilian Francesco Procopio dei Coltelli opened Le Procope, a café/ice cream establishment, in 1686. He may (or may not have) adopted the name Procopio from the historian Procopius.

The opening marked the beginning of some serious coffee drinking in Paris.

Procope was originally marketed as a lemonade shop, and its sumptuous décor combined with its air of sophistication attracted a clientele keen to distance itself from the more loutish elements of the day. The name “café” was given to the establishment only when (more…)

June 17, 2008

PARIS CAFE’s

According to an Atlanta Journal-Constitution newspaper article, “If coffee is the fuel of France, then the cafe may be the soul of France — a place to (more…)

Blog at WordPress.com.