CAROLYN'S COMPOSITIONS

March 26, 2014

The Lord’s Prayer: Part 3

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

A 6-PART STUDY OF THE LORD’S PRAYER

The Lord’s Prayer: Part 3

PART 3:

DAILY BREAD

MONTE W. HOLLAND, GUEST WRITER

Hill of Crosses in Lithuania

Hill of Crosses in Lithuania

NOTE: The main photo appearing on each part of this study features the Hill of Crosses in Lithuania. To learn about this spectacular site click on Hill of Crosses in Lithuania

 STUDY INTRODUCTION

This study began with my personal story, Where I Learned Key Church & Scripture Readings and continues with A 6-Part Study of The Lord’s Prayer: Part 1. Each of the 6 parts of this study of The Lord’s Prayer will reference selections drawn from the writings of three historical clergymen:

Matthew Henry (1662-1714)

Adam Clarke (1760-1832)

Albert Barnes (1798-1870)

These commentators lived long ago, but their words still ring true. They have a universal power in our lives.

I will write a personal perspective following the commentator’s words. I invite you to add any comment you might have in the comment box at the end of each study.

WEEK 3 INTRODUCTION

Give us this day our daily bread… Bread has always been on the agenda for sustaining life. While in the wilderness the Israelites existed mostly on manna, a basic bread-like substance. Jesus teaches us in our prayer to ask for that daily bread.

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MATTHEW HENRY (1662-1714)

      Every word here has a lesson in it: (1.) We ask for bread; that teaches us sobriety and temperance; we ask for bread, not dainties, not superfluities; that which is wholesome, though it be not nice. (2.) We ask for our bread; that teaches us honesty and industry: we do not ask for the bread out of other people’s mouths, not the bread of deceit (Pr 20:17), not the bread of idleness (Pr 31:27), but the bread honestly gotten. (3.) We ask for our daily bread; which teaches us not to take thought for the morrow (Mt 6:34), but constantly to depend upon divine Providence, as those that live from hand to mouth. (4.) We beg of God to give it us, not sell it us, nor lend it us, but give it. The greatest of men must be beholden to the mercy of God for their daily bread, (5.) We pray, “Give it to us; not to me only, but to others in common with me.” This teaches us charity, and a compassionate concern for the poor and needy. It intimates also, that we ought to pray with our families; we and our households eat together, and therefore ought to pray together. (6.) We pray that God would give us this day; which teaches us to renew the desire of our souls toward God, as the wants of our bodies are renewed; as duly as the day comes, we must pray to our heavenly Father, and reckon we could as well go a day without meat, as without prayer.

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