CAROLYN'S COMPOSITIONS

March 8, 2014

International Women’s Day 3/8/2014 & Women’s History Month


CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

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Hugs for all the women honored in this article… 

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY 3/8/2014
AND
WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH

March 8, 2014 is International Women’s Day.

  • Inspiring Change is the 2014 theme for our internationalwomensday.com global hub and encourages advocacy for women’s advancement everywhere in every way. It calls for challenging the status quo for women’s equality and vigilance inspiring positive change.

March is also Women’s History Month.

I know or read about women who are strong and/or do heroic things. I’m sharing some of their stories in today’s article.

MALALA YOUSAFZAI, PAKISTAN

It wasn’t being given a car that was the highlight of Malala Yousafzai’s 16th birthday. Her highlight was presenting an uplifting appeal for universal education to more than 1,000 youthful would-be diplomats gathered to mark the first “Malala Day” in mid-July, 2013.

“Let us pick up our books and our pens. They are our most powerful weapons,” she declared from the rostrum of the U. N. General Assembly forum. She thanked God—before whom, she said, “all are equal.”

The diminutive Pakistani teen isn’t the first person to proclaim the pen mightier than the sword, but she is probably the only teenager to emerge defiant after taking a bullet for the right of literacy.

Nine months before Malala was shot in the head by Taliban gunmen for defying their ban on girls’ education. Since then she has continued to pursue her mission for education for all.

STACEY FEILING, WESTMORELAND COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA

Kindness cut Stacey Feiling’s life short at 42 years of age.

While driving home from work on a rural Westmoreland County road Stacey stopped to help a stranger who was flagging her car. The bleeding woman, Janet, 37, begged for help for herself and her 16-year-old daughter. Both had been shot by Janet’s husband, Raymond in their home. The teenager ran to a neighbor’s while Janet ran to the road.
As Janet ran around Stacey’s vehicle Raymond opened Stacey’s door and fatally shot her at point blank range.
According to family and friends it was not unusual for Stacey to help others—they were not surprised she stopped to help a stranger.  (Habit of helping others claims innocent life )

LINDA: COURAGEOUS ENOUGH TO RELEASE HER NEWBORN

Sometimes life’s decisions are beyond difficult and require selfless courageous decisions.
Linda, 24, released her son for adoption. She didn’t release him out of selfishness. If selfishness were the motive she would have taken him home and raised him with his older sister. However, Linda had a history of extreme abuse, perpetrated on her by men. She feared she would take out her hatred of men on a male child. In sacrificial love she released him.

FRAN, COLLEEN, AND LEE: LOYAL CARETAKERS

For me, one of the most difficult requests that can be made is to be a caretaker. Fortunately, this has not been a requirement in my life.

Three friends deserve recognition for their years-long faithfulness in caring for husbands with severe medical issues. Fran not only cares for her husband but is present when her family members need her.

Colleen recently became a widow. As a young wife she became a caregiver. As her husband’s situation worsened she cared for him and raised their two young children.

Lee, as a young wife with two children, also cared for her very ill husband until his death made her a widow.

These are only three situations among many that I’ve become familiar with throughout the years. All caretakers deserve special recognition not only on International Women’s Day, but on the other 364 days of the year.

MADAME ROSALIE DE LEVAL (FRENCH IMMIGRANT): A  WOMAN BEFORE HER TIME

In 1791 Madame Rosalie de Leval emigrated from France to escape the French Revolution. In less than two months she had signed a tentative contract with Gen. Henry Knox and William Duer to purchase up to 220,000 acres of land in the Massachusetts territory of Maine. Her plan was to design a French community where her countrymen could maintain their homeland culture in preparation to return to France when the Revolution ended. This woman who didn’t speak English performed all the tasks required to develop this community, which never came into being because Gen. Knox never gave her the deed to the land.

KEZIAH SPIRES RUGH (INDIANA COUNTY, PA.): A STRONG WOMAN

In 1845 elderly Keziah Spires Rugh, widow of Michael Rugh, sued her step-son Daniel Rugh for non-support. At that time, a son inherited the father’s property with the stipulation that he care for the widow. He allegedly didn’t do this. The court awarded Keziah $100.00.
It’s the first time I heard of a woman suing her children/step-children for non-support.
HONOR to women who leave abusive situations to protect their children. This can be dangerous.
HONOR to young women who report sexual abuse, and follow it through, knowing how difficult it can be.

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On this day take a few minutes to reflect on those women in your life and your reading who influenced your life, who were role models for you. Thank you for reading CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS.

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2 Comments »

  1. So when is International Men’s day?   Or how about “Slavic American History Month” ?  Jewish American History Month?  “German American History Month”?

    ________________________________

    Comment by Fred Wells — March 8, 2014 @ 8:22 am | Reply

  2. Carolyn, hello. glad you’re recovering from eye surgery.
    Caregiving is a difficult job…I’m well acquainted with…first my father, then my mother-in-law, and my mother.
    All was different but stressful. My mother-in-law and mother was strong women. With my dad, the hard part, I also had small children…but I would do it again, maybe make better decisions.

    Comment by merry101 — March 9, 2014 @ 5:29 pm | Reply


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