CAROLYN'S COMPOSITIONS

June 30, 2013

About the Eagle on the National Seal

CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

ABOUT THE EAGLE

ON THE NATIONAL SEAL OF AMERICA

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Madame paused as a pair of bald eagles soared in the sky, their outstretched wings enhanced by their white-capped heads. They swirled and swooped through the air, flying high above her and low beneath her.

“They advance like a great ship cleaving to the swells and thrusting aside the smaller waves,” noted Madame.

“The Indians say that the eagle is the only bird that flies so high it can see and watch over people. That characteristic enables it to act as a liaison between the people and the Creator,” said the guide.

“Their wings seem to embrace the air in their bold flight…I wonder how wide their wingspan is,” said Madame.

“It can stretch up to eight feet…Eagles are fascinating. They can tell you when a storm is approaching long before it breaks. They fly to a high spot and wait for the winds to come. When the storm hits, they set their wings so that the wind will pick them up and lift them above the storm, where they will soar while the storm rages beneath them.”

Madame imagined herself soaring with the eagles, high above the storms of her life…. excerpted from my novel-under-construction, Intertwined Love.

Madame and Monsieur, French émigrés,viewed the American bald eagles from the top of Schoodic Mountain in Hancock County, Maine, in mid-October, 1791. Excerpted from my novel-under-construction, Intertwined Love

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The eagle received its initial, unofficial, recognition on June 20, 1782, when the Great Seal of the United States was adopted.

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As majestic as Madame and Monsieur found the American bald eagle not everyone in their time agreed. Four kinds of birds were suggested in preliminary Great Seal designs: a two-headed eagle, a (more…)

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