CAROLYN'S COMPOSITIONS

March 6, 2012

From Ligonier to Ligonier: Part II


CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

FROM LIGONIER TO LIGONIER: Part II

The Lincoln Highway ribbons coast to coast

from Times Square to the Golden Gate—

along the way it connects Ligonier to Ligonier

To read FROM LIGONIER TO LIGONIER: Part I click on:   https://carolyncholland.wordpress.com/2012/03/04/from-ligonier-to-ligonier-part-i/ 

March 1, 2011—Tuesday.

THE FOUNDING OF LIGONIER, PENNSYLVANIA

In 1758, when British forces launched a major campaign to remove French forces from the forks of the Ohio, now Pittsburgh, this spot on Loyalhanna Creek was the site of their westernmost camp before reaching the Ohio. It was an enormous army, a virtual moving city of 6,000 people, that temporarily made this the most populated spot in Pennsylvania second only to Philadelphia. The fort was named Fort Ligonier and the settlement that grew up around it was called the same until eventually being shortened to Ligonier.*
There were only a few families in the Valley when John Ramsey laid out a town in 1817, taking advantage of the new Philadelphia – Pittsburgh Turnpike. Stage coaches stopped and hitched their horses at hitching posts around what is now known as “the Diamond.” Passengers obtained food and supplies in local stores. Local farmers came to trade their produce for supplies and to hear the latest bits of news. Ramsey’s basic plan covered only four blocks around the public square, the Diamond. The town grew slowly and became an incorporated borough in 1834, and eventually thrived as the crossroads of the Valley and the shopping center for the farmers of the area.****

THE FOUNDING OF LIGONIER, INDIANA

Here’s an old shot of the Diamond I found on rootsweb called Ligonier PA to Ligonier, IN. Here’s an excerpt of the family history. 

In 1834 my father’s oldest sister, Elizabeth, married Isaac Cavin. They went at once to live in Indiana. They made the journey with two horses, one carrying all their worldly goods in a pack saddle and my aunt and uncle taking turns walking or riding the other horse. There were no roads to enable them to use a wagon. Arriving at their destination in Noble County, my uncle founded the new town and gave it the name of the old home town in Pennsylvania – Ligonier. In later years all the brothers and sisters of Elizabeth [Marker] Cavin came west and settled near Ligonier, Indiana. After great-grandfather, Mathias Marker, passed away, grandfather and grandmother, George and Mary McDowell Marker moved to Ligonier, Indiana, where they spent the later years of their lives and are buried in Salem Cemetery, near Ligonier.***

LANDMARK OF LIGONIER, INDIANA:

THE CLOCK AT TRIANGLE PARK

     As we entered and left Ligonier, Indiana, we noticed a small garden area with a tall clock in the center:

The clock that stands in Triangle Park was donated to the city in 1924 by John Cavin in memory of his father, pioneer Isaac Cavin who founded Ligonier. It was built by Seth-Thomas Co., of Thomaston, Connecticut in 1923. The original clock was weight driven and had to be wound once a week. In 1957 the works were converted to an electrical source.

     The historic clock was stationed in front of the American State Bank building until 1968, when the bank structure was razed. The clock moved to the front of the Ligonier Telephone Company, where it remained until 1981, when a truck traveling through the city struck it, leaving a disheveled mass of broken metal and glass. Neither the company that owned the truck nor the city coffer had the funds to replace the clock.

     After an anonymous donor left the city a $50,000 gift, two local men began a successful fundraising campaign. The clock parts and a shipment of Kidd’s marshmallows were packed and sent to a self-employed clockmaker in Newton, Massachusetts. After eighteen months and twelve hundred work hours the clock was restored, with its original color, and returned to Ligonier.

It was reassembled at the city-owned triangle of land on Lincolnway South and Cavin Street. The clock was put into service again at 2:20 PM on December 8th, 1984,*** where it became a symbol of Ligonier, Indiana.

LANDMARK OF LIGONIER, PENNSYLVANIA:

THE GAZEBO ON THE DIAMOND Pix 546e

 

     Ligonier, Pennsylvania, also has a symbol—a gazebo on the diamond, a traffic circle marking the center of the borough.

 

 

THE GAZEBO IN LIGONIER, INDIANA

     In Gazebo Park, on Main Street next to City Hall, sits a replica of our sister city’s landmark: the gazebo on the Diamond.**

The gazebo in Ligonier, Indiana was copied from our gazebo after the mayor exchange in 1976. They actually sent someone from their street department to measure and take photos of our gazebo and then built theirs in the city park next to their municipal building.***

NOTE: To read FROM LIGONIER TO LIGONIER: Part I click on: https://carolyncholland.wordpress.com/2012/03/04/from-ligonier-to-ligonier-part-i/ 

~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

SOURCES

*http://www.tripwiser.com/trip_destination-Pennsylvania_USA_Ligonier?itiNodeId=8ad198fc0cbeb4e4010cca8705d42e8b&eType=site

**http://www.ligonier-in.org/visiting_thingstodo.html

***http://ligonierliving.blogspot.com/2009/03/we-were-just-talking-about-our-sister.html

****http://www.ligonier.com/history.html

~~~~~~~~~~~~

ADDITIONAL READING:

LEE HORSELOGGER’S SOJOURN IN LAUGHLINTOWN, PA.

SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIANS DRINK MOXIE: Do They Like It?

THE YOUGHIOGHENY RIVER CRAWL

HOT DOG LIMERICKS

KILLED STRANGELY: A NEW ENGLAND MURDER STORY

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5 Comments »

  1. I enjoy reading your post. I’m researching my family history. Every time I come across a new find that unravels the mystery of my ancestors, I find a making of a nation. The excitement of that find must be similar of finding a sister town settled by the same family in a different state. Thank you.

    Comment by June — March 10, 2012 @ 7:08 am | Reply

  2. I LOVE THE CONNECTION– SO WELL PRESENTED, ALSO!!!!!!

    Comment by Joan — March 10, 2012 @ 11:44 am | Reply


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