CAROLYN'S COMPOSITIONS

March 18, 2011

Navy Yard Broadcast from Pearl Harbor: Part 4


CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

NAVY YARD BROADCAST FROM PEARL HARBOR: Part 4

This is the final of four parts of a radio broadcast aired from Pearl Harbor, March 18, 1942. The first part, an interview with Albert Briskay, a civilian worker dealing with submarine repair, was posted on December 7, 2009. The final part will be posted March 18, 2011. Links to previous posts are listed at the end of this post.

To view photo illustration,click on: http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolyncholland/3899210556/in/photostream/

 WAHL: Got a little Irish blood in me, myself. Happy to meet you, Mr. Milsop. When did you come over to this country?

MILSOP: You mean to Hawaii?

WAHL: Well, yes….but I meant the United States mainland.

MILSOP: I settled in Patterson, New Jersey, in 1897 and came to Hawaii last month. Was transferred here from the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn.  My family, my wife and three children, are still in Patterson.

WAHL: You have three children, eh?

MILSOP: Yes, two boys—one 35, practicing law, and another 28, who’s a commercial artist. My only daughter is a secretary in the Wright Aeronautical Plant. She’s 24.

WAHL: Mr. Milsop, one of the stock questions in these parts is “What was your first impression of the Islands?”

MILSOP: Are you asking me?

WAHL: Sure, would you care to tell us. You give us the truth, and we’ll take the consequences.

MILSOP: Well, now, I marveled most at the even climate. I like this balmy weather. And everything seems to be so colorful here. When I left New York, it was plenty cold. Freezing, in fact.

WAHL: Mr. Milsop, right here I’d like to ask you just what your reaction has been to our nightly blackouts and gasoline rationing?

MILSOP: Well, I guess it would spoil Hawaii for a tourist, but after all, we didn’t just come here for the ride.

WAHL: Do you live in Honolulu, or out here at Pearl Harbor?

MILSOP: I live in town at the Elk’s Club.

WAHL: With tires on their way out and the gas situation as it is, how do you get to and from your work?

MILSOP: That’s simple. I take a bus.

WAHL: If you were allowed to send a message back to your family in Patterson, New Jersey, through this microphone, what would you say?

MILSOP: Well, I know you can’t send personal greetings on the radio, but if I could I’d tell my gang that the old man is doing his best to live up to the standards of the men who were here on December seventh. After hearing about the guts these men showed under fire, I’m here to admit that the Irish aren’t the only ones in the world who love a fight.

WAHL: Well, speaking of the Irish, Mr. Milsop, when do you think the old country will get in this war?

MILSOP: The old Country? Say, my part of the old country IS in. I come from Ulster. And they’re in plenty.

WAHL: That’s the spirit! We’re all in it together. Goodbye, Tom Milsop, and good luck to you.

And now I think it’s about time we folded up our microphone. We’re in the way of busy people. Captain Swain, thanks for your hospitality. We’ve had a thrill being out here with you today.

In closing, may I express our thanks to Admiral Bloch, Commandant of the Fourteenth Naval District, and to Admiral Furlong, Commandant of the Yard, for their generous help and cooperation. That goes, too, for everyone else out here who has been so cooperative, the Navy’s telephone men and the boys who have taken part in our interviews. We hope we have been able to give some small impression of this place, the spirit it reflects and the significance of this Navy Yard to the future and safety of everyone listening on the Mainland. I wish that we might give more detail of the astounding job that has been done in putting back into commission the ships which our enemy claimed as lost. Someday the story will be told. For the present our interest in security makes us substitute discretion for our natural instinct for news and showmanship. But be sure of this—the job is being done and done well. I’m here to tell you that not only you but the enemy will have cause before long to “Remember Pearl Harbor”. This is Jim Wahl, speaking from Hawaii—returning you now to the National Broadcasting Company.

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ADDITIONAL READING:

Pearl Harbor: A 1942 Radio Broadcast Script

Navy Yard Broadcast from Pearl Harbor: Part 2

Laurel Mountain Borough, Pennsylvania: Quaint

Earthquakes in (Southwestern) Pennsylvania

You are invited to visit Intertwined Love’s blog site

Memoir Writing Can Elicit Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome

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