CAROLYN'S COMPOSITIONS

September 9, 2010

Tales of Rare Lobsters


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CAROLYN’S CREATIONS

TALES OF RARE LOBSTERS

     Ariel, kidnapped, probably became part of a BBQ. Skye Bloo became a blue-plate special for his roommate. After Ol’ Blue Claws, a.k.a Cobalt or Papa Smurf, was evicted from his Portland, Maine residence, he took up residence in Rye, New Hampshire.

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     Over the years, I’ve collected a selection of articles on lobsters. Summer’s end is a good time to share some lobster tales with you. Links at the end of the post will lead to more lobster tales. 

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     Ariel was a rare albino lobster discovered by a local fisherman in 1997, and donated to the Newquay’s Sea Life Centre in Great Britain.     

     Albino lobsters are very rare, partially because their lack of camouflage makes them an easy target for predators, including their fellow lobsters. Thus, they do not usually survive for very long in the wild.

      Ariel was around one-and-a-half feet long and weighed around three pounds. He was a real star at the aquarium, where he had his own private tank, which kept him safe from being attacked by other lobsters.

     Three years after his capture, or protective custody, an aquarium curator noticed the lid on Ariel’s tank had been tampered with. A search of the centre revealed a hole in a nearby fence, and a missing fish crate.  The crate was later discovered next to a burnt out fire on a beach.  The evidence suggests Ariel was cooked on a fire and eaten. (23 August, 2000 UK)

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    Robin Egg Blue was hauled from Long Island Sound. He was the second rare blue lobster harvested by a commercial fisherman at Long Island Sound.

     The fisherman treated his first rare lobster, Skye Bloo, like royalty. Skye had a specially built tank and a protein-rich minnow diet. To prevent him from being lonely, the fisherman moved a second lobster, Booey Bluey, into the tank.

     (NOTE: I dubbed each lobster with its moniker for the purposes of this post.)

     Oops!

     Almost immediately, Skye became Booey’s blue-plate special. Lobsters, being cannibals, have no trouble dining on their roommates.

     After Booey’s gourmet meal, the kind fisherman had only remnants of Skye to dispose of—mostly his top parts.

     “I guess it’s true: Even lobsters prefer the tails,” the fisherman commented as tears rolled down his cheeks.

     “Having harvested Robin, I intend to keep him solo.”

     Ultimately, Booey didn’t answer the question: do blue lobsters taste any different from the normally colored lobsters? (August 18, 2000)

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     Ol’ Blue Claws, an American lobster (or Northern lobster or Maine lobster), lost his freedom in the Maine Gulf. He entered a trap set out by a Maine fisherman, who recognized that Ol’ Blue’s distinctively blue-colored shell made him a rare crustacean. He took Ol’ Bloo to the Portland Children’s Museum for safe keeping.

      Ol’ Blue apparently doesn’t like captivity. Or perhaps his survival depended on aggressiveness. Or maybe he is just mean natured and enjoys being combative. At any rate, his fondness for battling his aquarium neighbors became so disruptive that Museum officials ousted him. Fortunately, the Seabrook Science Center in Rye, New Hampshire, stepped in and saved the day. They provided aquarium space to Ol’ Blue.

     Initially, Ol’ Blue was placed in the Science Center’s main tank.

     Wrong move!

     He immediately initiated battle with his sea creature roommates, which included fish—Anglers, flounder, sea bass, cuter—, sea sponges, eels, and the two rock crabs he clasped in his claws and whacked and whacked on the side of the tank. Ol’ Blue didn’t release them until a Science Center employee took a broom and thumped him on his backside. Fortunately, the rock crabs survived Ol’ Blue’s attack. But I wonder how his terrorism affected their psyche.

     A Plexiglas separator was installed in the tank to protect the other sea creatures from this genetic mutant. Ol’ Blue and the rock crabs now spend their time staring at each other. I can just imagine what Ol’ Blue is thinking and dreaming about…

     In spite of Ol’ Blue’s terrorism, the Science Center staff considers the eighteen to twenty inch long crustacean, who weighs in at one and a half pounds, to be an amazing animal—a real busybody, a real sport, and “we all love him.”

     “He’s landscaping the sand; he’s moving rocks around, building hills, he has a real personality.”

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ADDITIONAL READING:

OBITUARY FOR BLUE BUOY (A Blue Lobster)

LOBSTER-TALES

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3 Comments »

  1. goood job:)

    Comment by jordan-taylor — September 9, 2010 @ 4:19 pm | Reply

  2. Posted at 1:30 am??? C’mon, Carolyn, get some sleep!

    Lois

    Comment by Lois — September 10, 2010 @ 1:34 pm | Reply

  3. Lois, haven’t you noticed? Most of my writings are posted at 1:30 a.m.! I never sleep! No rest for the wicked! Carolyn

    Comment by carolyncholland — September 10, 2010 @ 6:48 pm | Reply


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