CAROLYN'S COMPOSITIONS

January 9, 2010

Blogging: Does it Have Value? Part 1


CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

BLOGGING: DOES IT HAVE VALUE? Part 1

This is the first segment of a three-part post on blogging.

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     On the evening of December 7, three days before the death of Latrobe (PA)’s last Holocaust survivor, Robert (Reibieson) Mendler, Carolyn’s Composition’s writing site received a comment on his posted story (THE HOLOCAUST STORY OF A TEENAGE VICTIM (Part 1)). Janet, a survivor of Nowy-Targ, Poland—Bob’s childhood community— had discovered Bob’s story after she typed Nowy-Targ into her computer search engine. She wanted to meet the only other Nowy-Targ (Poland) child survivor she’d discovered. And she discovered his survival by reading my blog. (to read post click on AN UNEXPECTED VISIT WITH BOB MENDLER ON DECEMBER 8, 2009 )

     On December 8, my husband Monte and I met with Bob, who was thrilled. Yes, he remembered he was ten years old when Janet was born. Both his and her families knew each other well. He would (and did) E-mail Janet. He told her he would call her.

     As fate would have it, the phone call was never to be. Bob died the evening of December 10. However, I’ve since talked to Janet. Although she feels the loss of a man she never knew, there is potential for our continued contact.

     This is only one of the surprising results of my blogging—connection and new friendship.

     I’m often asked if blogging is valuable. My response is a resounding “YES.” It creates a platform to publish some writing that may have no other venue, or that I choose not to submit to print publications; it allows me to create a journal in which I can share events in my life with others; it allows me to introduce people to my larger writing—through research articles and character sketches; it opens doors to genealogy research—and it connects people.

     Recently I received two comments on my post IN SEARCH OF THE ARABELLA: A Story of Two Boats:I am related to Lt. Robert Seeley, second in command on the Winthrop Fleet. I am so happy you are keeping the memory of the history of the brave people that traveled so far and by faith that God would bring them to a new life…Anyone wishing to contact me regarding Seeley family connection is greatly appreciated.and Hi, anyone know where I can get a list of the passengers on the original Arabella? I am trying to track down william evans who came to New England around 1630. thanks for any help. Sallie

     These comments demonstrate that blogging serves as an alternative route for genealogy research. I’ve utilized this forum myself, by posting information on a Civil War Veteran, Charles F. Walker (Lamoine, Maine) whose gravesite location is unknown—while the small cemetery where he is likely to be buried contains a grave with an “unknown Civil War Veteran.” (RIGHTING A CIVIL WAR WRONG: A Gravestone for a Civil War Veteran)

     A post on Rebecca Cornell and her son, Thomas Cornell (KILLED STRANGELY: A NEW ENGLAND MURDER STORY ), has generated the most comments through the years: I guess we are shirt-tail relatives as we both descend from Rebecca (Briggs) Cornell, as well as Lizzie ( a little error—my Cornell lineage separates from the Lizzie Borden lineage) I am descended . If Thomas and Lizzie are guilty I hope it’s not genetic as my Great-Great Grandmother, Caroline Briggs, and her son, David Briggs, were convicted of killing a teacher in Southern Oregon in 1874… and  Thomas Cornell was my eighth great grandfather. I’m going to Rhode Island in three weeks to visit these spots you mention and others. Were you able to find the graveyard where he is buried? There is a lot of interest in the historic Cornell cemetery, which I also wrote about in my post IN NEW ENGLAND, HISTORY CONFLICTS WITH PROGRESS.

     During the autumn of 2009 the Killed Strangely post were quite active as several Cornell descendents found their way to the cemetery in Middletown (formerly part of Portsmouth), on Acquidneck Island, Rhode Island. Thomas and Rebecca were also my “grandparents.” I did return to Portsmouth in April ’09, and easily found the cemetery behind the condos. My brother George was with me and we spent many sweaty hours with assorted handtools clearing out debris and undergrowth. We found the plastic flowers scattered about and bundled them next to a tombstone. Many of the stones are still legible… and Hi Everyone— we found the cemetery yesterday— Craig, you did a wonderful description job on how to find it– John, sorry to say all your hard work needs redoing…there are lots of broken stones etc— kim..; I also am a member of the humble corp of direct descendants of Thomas Cornell. My home is in New Jersey, and I visited the Cornell cemetery in April with my brother Jack…who has posted comments above.

     Another post, SEVENTY YEARS OF LOVE ,elicited the following response: Wow, what a treasure to have found this. Carl Pincheck is my great uncle, the brother of my late grandfather, Henry Penzcak (the actual/original spelling of the family surname). We visited Carl and Mary when my grandmother died in 1992. It was amazing to witness their love and life. It was, in fact, an amazing childhood spent visiting my grandparents in the small town of Republic and even smaller burough of Cardale. I’m going to print this interview for my scrapbook. I would love to know how you came to interview my great uncle. I responded, offering her copies of the photographs I took when I interviewed her great-uncle.

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To read BLOGGING: DOES IT HAVE VALUE? Part 2, click on 

Blogging: Does it Have Value? Part 2 or

https://carolyncholland.wordpress.com/2010/01/17/blogging-does-it-have-value-part-2/

Don’t forget to sign up for a subscription to Carolyn’s Compositions—see the top of the right hand column.

Have you made a comment? For “comment competition” rules click https://carolyncholland.wordpress.com/monthly-prize-for-comments/

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ADDITIONAL READING:

www.beanerywriters.wordpress.com

ARE WEBSITES (BLOGSITES) BENEFICIAL TO WRITERS?

Memoir Writing Can Elicit Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome

SELF-PUBLISHING AS I WANDER THROUGH IT

SHOULD INFORMATION ON AN ALLEGED CHILD ABUSER BE PUBLICIZED?

A PROFILE OF BEST SELLING AUTHORS

Can You Write Your Memoir in Six Words?

INTEGRITY: A JOURNALISTIC CODE OF ETHICS REVIEW

These Gifts Won’t Be Regifted

3 Comments »

  1. AS RESULT OF FINDING CAROLYN’S BLOG, I WAS SO FORTUNATE TO READ ABOUT BOB MENDLER’S LIFE. ALTHOUGH, I WAS NOT FORTUNATE TO SPEAK TO BOB DUE TO HIS SUDDEN DEATH, AND HAVE MADE A WONDERFUL CONNECTION WITH CAROLYN. SHE GAVE ME SOME IDEAS AND SUGGESTIONS OF HOW TO CONSTRUCT THE BOOK I AM WRITING. WHAT IS SO INTERESTING IS THE REALIZATION THAT WE ARE ALL CONNECTED IN SOME WAYS. IT’S IMPORTANT TO BE OPEN TO NEW POSSIBILITIES. ONE NEVER KNOWS WHAT WILL MATERIALIZE.
    I AM GRATEFUL TO HAVE MADE THIS CONNECTION. JANET APPLEFIELD

    Comment by janet singer applefield — January 9, 2010 @ 5:32 am | Reply

  2. Janet, Thanks ever so much for your comment. We welcome you as a long-distance member of the Beanery Writers Group, and hope that both I and the group can be of help to you.

    Please bring back a report from the Geneva Writers Conference. I’m sure other writers would like to know of your experience there.

    Carolyn

    Comment by carolyncholland — January 9, 2010 @ 4:14 pm | Reply

  3. I am so happy I stumbled on Carolyn’s blog. Sadly, I was not able to connect via telephone with Bob Mendler, a Holocaust survivor from my home town in Poland, due to his sudden death. I am so pleased to have made a new friend, namely, Carolyn Holland. This could not have happened if not for her blog. Thank you, Carolyn.

    Comment by janet singer applefield — January 17, 2010 @ 2:38 pm | Reply


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