CAROLYN'S COMPOSITIONS

August 28, 2008

PENNSYLVANIA WEDDING, (LAMOINE) MAINE ROOTS


CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS
PENNSYLVANIA WEDDING, (LAMOINE) MAINE ROOTS

ANNOUNCEMENT
The bride in a Pennsylvania wedding is a descendant of the first settlers in Trenton (which included Lamoine), Massachusetts (now Maine).

WEDDING
Sandra N. Holland and Michael R. Murawsky were married July 12, 2008, at Lebanon United Methodist Church in Ligonier, Pennsylvania. Sandra is the daughter of Monte W. and Carolyn (Cornell) Holland, Laurel Mountain Borough, Pennsylvania. Michael is the son of Ronald and Sheila (Marien) Murawski of Houtzdale, Pennsylvania.

The bride wore a white gown and carried a bouquet of freshly picked summer flowers.
Unique to Sandra’s bridal outfit were the traditional “something old” items. She wore a garter that was worn by her mother in her 1966 wedding.

Sandra also incorporated items from her great grandmother’s wedding: May Isabelle (Mable) Walker married Albert Briskay on December 29,1920 in Quincy, Massachusetts.

Sandra’s bouquet was wrapped in a hand-beaded piece of her grandmother’s 88-year old wedding gown and tied with a length of ribbon from the 1920 wedding corsage.

In addition, Sandra’s white bible, presented to her by her parents on Easter when she was nine years old, laid on the altar. Mable’s silk wedding gloves and a dried rose from her wedding corsage rested on the Bible.

The wedding couple was surprised when the pianist was replaced by a bagpiper in Scottish plaid. She played the traditional wedding march, Amazing Grace and led the newly weds out of the church with a Scottish melody.

Without consulting each other, both the bride’s mother and the groom’s mother wore dresses of light green.

The church was decorated with vases of summer flowers and pots of lilies.

A picnic reception followed at Laurel Mountain Park’s Shelter house and swimming pool.

WEDDING PHOTOS
http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolyncholland/2696522773/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolyncholland/2696522851/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolyncholland/2696522691/in/photostream/

LAMOINE ROOTS
Although May Isabelle Walker did not live in Lamoine, she must have visited there frequently. Her father, Allen Wilson Walker, grew up in Lamoine. He was the son of Charles French and Armenia (des Isles) Walker.
 
Charles was the son of Isaac and Abigail (Holt) Walker, who seemingly traveled between Exeter/Gardner, Maine and Lamoine. Armenia was the daughter of William and Isabella (Young) Des Isles.

William Des Isles was the son of Louis and Mary (Googins) des Isles. Isabella Young was the daughter of Solomon and Sarah (Lord) Young.

Solomon Young was the son of Elkanah and Mary (Lewis) Young. I do not have information on the parents of Sarah Lord’s parents.

Elkanah Young removed to Mt. Desert and Trenton from Eastham, Massachusetts about the late 1770s.

Louis des Isles emigrated from France to Trenton about 1791. Mary was the daughter of Roger and Elizabeth (Welch) Googins, who removed to Trenton from Biddeford, Maine in the late 1760s. Mary was born in Trenton in 1775.

ANECDOTES
Allen Walker, who lived on the road to Lamoine Beach (near and across from the John Winterbotham residence) owned a boat, the Arabella. According to the late Gladys Vigent (also a des Isles descendant), he used it to take people from the dock at Lamoine to the Ovens across the water, where summer picnics were held. (Read IN SEARCH OF THE ARABELLA: A Story of Two Boats )
PHOTOS: http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolyncholland/2416768839/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolyncholland/2416768807/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolyncholland/2417589132/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolyncholland/2453691917/

Gladys also said that Mable Walker played the piano at her wedding, and that Mable’s son, the late John (Jack) Walker Briskay, sang at her wedding. Mable’s daughter, Nancy Isabelle Briskay, assisted in the wedding activities.

Nancy, who married Robert William Cornell of Brocton, Massachusetts, was Sandra’s grandmother and my mother. 

INVITATION FOR READER RESPONSE
I’d enjoy hearing from readers who are connected in any way to the above families (des Isles, Googins, Rogers, Young, Holt, Walker), or who are interested in these family genealogies, are welcome to contact me. I’m also seeking information on descendants of Joseph Swett. Charles de Laittre (some migrated to Minnesota), Madame Rosalie de la Val, and de la Roche.

If readers can identify and document any errors, I would appreciate hearing from you.

E-mail chollandnews at yahoo.com.

ADDITIONAL READING:

HEIDI

IN SEARCH OF THE ARABELLA: A Story of Two Boats

LOGGING IN MAINE AND ON THE PERU-BRAZILLIAN BORDER

CHILD ABUSE AND SCRIPTURE

OF FIREFLIES AND LIGHTNING BUGS

KEEPING PEACE IN SOUTH AFRICA Part 1

BRAMBLES (Brief RAMBLES) 1-5 June 15, 2008

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4 Comments »

  1. Elkanah Young 1745- Dec 4 1832 was the same Elkanah Young who participated in the Boston Tea Party, son of Elkanha Young and Mercy Mayo great grand daughter of Pilgram Thomas Rogers.
    Elkanah Young married first Rebecca Higgins and second Mary Lewis. Elkanah and Mary being of my wife’s line

    Comment by Howard Fife — May 19, 2009 @ 2:32 pm | Reply

  2. Was Thomas Rogers of the same family of Rogers that resided in the Saco-Biddeford area, and was the ancestor of Mary Googins, who wed Louis Des Isles in 1796?

    I too descend from Elkanah and Mary Lewis. How does your wife’s descendancy go? Mine connects with Elkanah’s and Mary’s with the marriage of William des Isles to Isabella Young.

    Carolyn C. Holland

    Comment by carolyncholland — May 19, 2009 @ 10:49 pm | Reply

    • My wifes line is the Male line back to John Young 1624 Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts

      Elkanah Young and Mercy Mayo

      Nathan “Nathaniel” Young and Rebecca Shaw

      Nathaniel Young and Mercy Davis

      John Young and Abigail Howland daughter of Henry Howland brother of John Howland of the Mayflower

      Comment by Howard Fife — December 22, 2009 @ 6:47 pm | Reply

  3. That is so sweet how they incorporate parts of her grandmother’s wedding into their ceremony. What a lovely idea.

    Comment by amberdawn — March 28, 2010 @ 12:49 am | Reply


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